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you identify -- do you look through mug shots? how do you find that person? >> the technology has improved tremendously in terms of facial recognition technology and they are using that matching images on video at the scene to any faces that might be in databases and running that to see if there's any sort of match. another way is, okay, here's an image that we've got. let's go back to others who we know that were at the scene and who were at businesses nearby and show a picture. that would be routine police work that is done. that's many, many aspects and i'm sure there are others that they are not going to talk to us about as they attempt to track down who planted these devices. >> help me here because all the time we're talking about union station or 30th street station in philly or anywhere, there's a big stein and an announcement. why don't they let the people see the person and say, i know this i goo, i know this woman? i assume it's a guy. >> that's part of the debate that's been going on all day today as you look at the mess that went on this afternoon with some of the bad
that can go on as well with the way that this is developing. >> what kind of technology do they have that -- that could help them with this? i mean, when you talk to any investigator, any district attorney, they talk about the effect of television programs where the technology is so much more sophisticated than in real life but what about things like facial recognition? >> well, i think that's key. agencies like immigration and customs enforcement and customs and border protection are huge in a case like this because they might be able to tell you about something, if there was reason for some person to be a foreign visitor or foreign traveler, but facial recognition software, you know, when it's in certain places, airports or some place, can be upheld, but you don't know how somebody might have come or could be a local person so it's only limited. the more value is the digital age. if that praf is photograph is pn everybody's iphone, on the national media and everybody starts calling in. everybody starts calling in. i think it's my uncle freddy. i think it's joe down the street, and
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3